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NASA probes moon’s surface

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This image obtained from NASA shows a plume from the imapct of the Centaur spacecraft from the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) as it struck the lunar surface on October 9. A NASA satellite that hurtled into a Moon crater on an exploratory mission last week sent back “exciting” images from every phase of its flight and subsequent crash, the US space agency said.

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This NASA handout image taken by the Galileo spacecraft shows the Moon. An instrument aboard an Indian space probe has boosted a hypothesis that the Moon generates water thanks to collisions between solar particles and lunar dust, the European Space Agency (ESA) said on Thursday.

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A close-up of the lunar south pole with the LCROSS target crater Cabeus at bottom-center. NASA would make an explosive return to the moon when it sends a satellite and a rocket booster crashing into a lunar crater to look for water.

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The United States successfully blasted a rocket into the moon on Friday, slamming it into a crater near the lunar south pole in a bid to discover water. Duration: 01:51

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NASA blasted the surface of the moon with two spacecraft on Friday in a dramatic bid to find water on the lunar surface, an experiment that could be a stepping stone to a permanent moon base.

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NASA Ames Research Center Director Pete Worden speaks at a news conference after the twin impacts of LCROSS, and its rocket’s upper stage in Moffett Field, California October 9, 2009. Searching for stocks of water on the moon, NASA crashed two spacecraft into an eternally dark lunar crater, hoping to splash ice into the light where instruments could assess it.

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Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite’s (LCROSS) principal investigator Tony Colaperte speaks at a news conference after the twin impacts of LCROSS, and its rocket’s upper stage in Moffett Field, California October 9, 2009. Searching for stocks of water on the moon, NASA crashed two spacecraft into an eternally dark lunar crater, hoping to splash ice into the light where instruments could assess it.

Shoot the Moon

This image provided by NASA shows the first image taken of the moon from the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite Friday morning Oct. 9, 2009. Two NASA spacecraft are barreling toward the moon at twice the speed of a bullet, about to crash into a lunar crater in a search for ice.

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NASA’s Lunar CRater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) and its Centaur booster rocket crashes into the moon in this artist’s illustration released October 9, 2009. The mission is designed to determine whether there is useful water ice hidden in the rocks and soil of a deep polar crater. REUTERS/NASA/Handout (UNITED STATES SCI TECH) FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS

Shoot

This artist’s rendering provided by NASA via Brown University shows the Centaur upper stage rocket separating from its shepherding spacecraft on a trajectory toward the moon. On Friday, Oct. 9, 2009, NASA will crash the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite, or LCROSS, into a crater on the moon

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The moon rises over Cairo, September 10, 2009. Three separate missions examining the moon have found clear evidence of water there, apparently concentrated at the poles and possibly formed by the solar wind.

October 21, 2009 - Posted by | News | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

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